‘Coffee and Cocktails’ ECR podcast on the job market to air later this summer

long-term-unemployed

On Saturday 24 June ETE will be hosting (and recording) the first of a two part podcast series called ‘Coffee and Cocktails’. The first program will discuss issues faced by early career researchers/ recent doctoral graduates regarding the job market. Watch this space for future details regarding the show’s premier on YouTube later this summer.

Host: Dr Ann Wand (University of Oxford)
http://www.anthro.ox.ac.uk/people/dr-ann-wand

ECRs:
Dr Chihab El Khachab (Universtty of Oxford)

http://www.anthro.ox.ac.uk/people/dr-chihab-el-khachab

Dr Venetia Congdon (University of Oxford)

https://www.isca.ox.ac.uk/people/dr-venetia-congdon

Dr Timothy Thurston (Smithsonian Institute)

http://timothyothurston.weebly.com/

Alterity and the Research Imagination Conference (Lisbon, 25-26 January 2018)

UCP_cores-directas

 

25–26 January 2018

School of Human Sciences ׀ Universidade Católica Portuguesa in Lisbon

Preoccupation with theories and practices of representation and othering, across the breadth of various genres and disciplines, has moved forward debates about positioning in research and modes of constructing and producing knowledge. In Meatless Days (1989), a vivid memoir of her girlhood in postcolonial Pakistan, Sara Suleri Goodyear deplores being regarded as an “otherness machine”—a concern Kwame Anthony Appiah (1991) shares in his famous critique of postcolonial literature, culture and critical studies. A host of scholars who tend to conflate the post-isms as such contend that postcolonial theory and praxis are embedded in Western institutions that shape the field. Aijaz Ahmad (1992) and Arif Dirlik (1994) have argued that, owing to its reliance on poststructuralist approaches, postcolonial thought excludes questions of economic and political power structures. A staunch Derridean who uses deconstruction to uncover and disrupt such inevitable hegemonic relations of power in the academy or elsewhere, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak (1999) has likewise dissociated herself from the postcolonial mainstream. Edward Said (1983), whose groundbreaking book Orientalism (1978) sets out a toolbox for colonial discourse analysis, has grown more and more dissatisfied with the untenable apolitical nature of the theoretical insights of Derrida, Foucault and others. Yet, some scholars, and Said himself, have pointed to the geocultural limitations of his theoretical model. In considering discourses of orientalism and balkanism, for instance, Maria Todorova (1997) argues that, unlike the Orient, the Balkans is a concrete entity that is peripheral, but not completely other, to Europe. Paul Gilroy has challenged the racial and ethnocentric biases inherent within British cultural studies in his first major work There Ain’t no Black in the Union Jack (1987). His discussion of diasporic hybridity (1993), however, has been censured for being gender-neutral. In his seminal essay The New Cultural Politics of Difference (1990), Cornel West locates his polemic on the emergence of the new black (or African-American) cultural worker in a critical historical juncture that might be comparable to what Stuart Hall calls “the end of the innocent notion of the essential black subject” (1988). More recently, Arjun Appadurai (2006) has made the case for research as a human right—an exercise of the imagination that is intrinsic to knowledge citizenship in the era of globalization. This conference considers the theoretical and methodological conundrums researchers and practitioners in the humanities, arts and social sciences face when encountering sites of alterity. We invite proposals that engage with the concept of alterity and subject it to a searching critique through the lenses of multiple disciplines. Themes of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Representations of alterity in film, literature, architecture, the visual and performing arts, etc.
  • Alternative media, politics and creativity
  • Multicultural, intercultural and transcultural communication
  • Critical human geography
  • The everyday—its antecedents and simulacra
  • Sociality and the ethics of care
  • Hybrid modalities of identity and difference
  • Ethnographic translations of radical alterity

The working language of the conference is English.

Individual paper presentations will be allocated 20 minutes for presentation and 10 minutes for questions. Proposals for panels of 3 papers (90 minutes) or roundtables of 3–5 participants (60 minutes) related to the theme of the conference are welcome. We aim to integrate an ambitious range of perspectives. Proposals incorporating practice as research, or other creative work, are encouraged.

Please send an abstract (250 words) and a brief biographical note (150 words) to alterityresearchimagination@gmail.com. All proposals should include a title, your name(s), contact details and, if relevant, institutional affiliation(s). The deadline for submission of proposals is 31 August 2017. Notifications of acceptance or rejection will be sent on 1 October 2017. The deadline for registration is 15 November 2017.

Organizing Committee
Amani Maihoub (CECC-UCP)
Gregor Taul (CECC-UCP)

Contact
The Lisbon Consortium
Faculdade de Ciências Humanas
Universidade Católica Portuguesa
Palma de Cima
1649-023 Lisbon
Portugal

Website: www.alterityresearchimagination.wordpress.com
E-mail: alterityresearchimagination@gmail.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/events/170653563468620/
Twitter: twitter.com/AlterityVII

‘Coffee and Cocktails’ Podcast series: looking for Early Career Researchers, 24 June 2017

What-Is-A-Podcast

SATURDAY 24 JUNE 2017

Time: 14.30-15.30 (GMT)

ETE is on the search for three early career researchers to participate in a two-part 20 minute podcast series based in Oxford called ‘Coffee and Cocktails’. The first podcast will focus on issues faced by early career researchers/ recent doctoral graduates regarding the job market, accompanied by drinks and snacks. This podcast is designed to be a laid back approach to rather serious concerns faced in academia. If you’d like to participate and/or have any ideas for future topics, please contact ETE’s Founder.

Oxford University’s ‘Winter Festivals and Traditions’ conference- available online!

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The Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology (ISCA) at Oxford University has published their ‘Winter Festivals and Traditions’ conference on ETE Education’s YouTube Channel. More information on the speakers and their abstracts can be found here. Otherwise the presenters’ videos can be accessed here.

Enjoy!

Tickets on sale for ‘Winter festivals and traditions’ conference, Oxford University- 25 March, 2017

krampus

http://www.wegottickets.com/event/392174

Tickets are now available for the ‘Winter festivals and traditions’ conference at Oxford University for 25 March 2017. A copy of the program is available below:

‘Winter Festivals and Traditions’ Conference

Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Oxford University

9.15-9.45- Registration (Coffee, tea and biscuits will be provided)- Make sure to bring your tickets with you when registering

9.45-10.00 – Opening remarks: Dr Ann Wand, Oxford University

10.00-11.15 – Panel I: Festivals through history

Chair: Johana Musalkova, Oxford University

Presenters:

Dr Brigid Burke, Montclair State University (USA)

The Lenaia: The winter festival of Dionysus in the context of Greek beliefs about death and the afterlife

Dr Joy Fraser, George Mason University (USA)

“Some fiends disguised as mummers”: The Isaac Mercer murder case and the politics of sectarianism in nineteenth century Newfoundland

Dr Richard Irvine, Cambridge University (UK)

Following the bear: the revival of East Anglian Straw Bear traditions

11.15-11.30- Break

11.30-12.30 – Guest speaker

Convenor: Dr Ann Wand, Oxford University

Dr Cesare Poppi, La Scuola Universitaria Professionale della Svizzera Italiana (Switzerland)

Sex and the Afterweb: rethinking tradition and cultural continuity

12.30-13.30 – Lunch (Coffee, tea and snacks will be provided)

13.30-14.45 – Panel II: Krampus and Christmas

Chair: Dr Ann Wand, Oxford University

Presenters:

Dr Gertraud Seiser and Dr Matthäus Rest, University of Vienna and University of Munich (Austria and Germany)

Wild and beautiful: the Krampus in Salzburg

Amber Dorko Stopper, co-founder of Parade of Spirits, Liberty Lands (USA)

Spectres and spectra: building self-sustaining folklore and neurodiversity inclusion into processional arts

Lucinda Murphy, Durham University (UK)

The nostalgia of Christmas worship: a resource for re-collection, re-flection and re-newal

14.45-15.15 = Coffee and tea break (biscuits included)

15.15-16.30- Panel III: Carnival, museums and department stores

Chair: Dr Nicolette Makovicky, Oxford University

Prof. Adrian Franklin, University of Tasmania (Australia)

Where ‘art meets life’: the making of Australia’s most successful mid-winter festival [Dark MOFO] in Hobart, Tasmania

Dr Gareth Hamilton and Dita Vinovska, University of Latvia

Losing ‘track’ of inverted time and space: the ‘Crazy Days’ in and outside a Finnish-owned department store in Riga

Dr Giovanni Kezich and Antonella Mott, Museo degli Usi e Costumi della Gente Trentina (Italy)

Carnival king of Europe: European winter masquerades in ethnographic perspective

16.30-16.45 – Break

16.45-17.45- Panel IV: Animals in festivals

Chair: Robin Smith, Oxford University

Dr Francesco Della Costa, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Be’er Sheva (Israel)

The venerable pig: ritual food sharing within a traditional festival in Abruzzo, Italy

Pawel Sendyka, Jagiellonian University (Poland)

The bacas and the priests: how the old adversaries came together to revive and reinterpret tradition

17.45-18.00- Closing remarks: Dr Robert Parkin, Oxford University

 

Call for papers: Winter festivals and traditions, Oxford University- 25 March 2017

Call for papers: Conference on Winter Festivals and Traditions at Oxford University, 25 March 2017

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The Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology (ISCA) at Oxford University will be hosting a one-day conference on Saturday 25 March 2017. The conference will focus on ‘Winter Festivals and Traditions’ as part of a larger research discussion on ritual, religion and secularism in modern-day Europe. We invite participants with disciplines in anthropology, religious studies, cultural studies, folklore and similar professions. Topics for submission are not restricted to Europe, but can focus on traditions worldwide.

The objective of this conference is to bring together various disciplines and departments to reconsider how folklore can be interpreted in order to understand the reasoning behind modern traditions in society. Our guest speaker, Dr Cesare Poppi, PhD (Cantab) of la Scuola Universitaria Professionale della Svizzera Italiana (SUPSI), will contribute to an invigorating discussion based on his extensive research on masked rituals and traditions in South Tyrol and Trentino, Italy and Northwestern Ghana.

Paper themes for consideration include, but are not limited to:

  • Mumming/ Masks
  • Neo-paganism, Wicca/ Witchcraft
  • Performance studies
  • Ritual and symbolism
  • Folklore and myth
  • Festivals, nationalism and the State
  • Identity politics
  • Museum studies
  • Religion and Secularism

Applicants should submit abstracts of no more than 250 words followed by a brief description of their background by 7 February 2017. Successful applicants will be notified by 15 February 2017.

Please send your abstracts and any questions you may have to the convenor, Dr Ann Wand at: ann.wand(at)anthro.ox.ac.uk

Call for applications for a funded PhD position studying black middle class in South Africa

Call for applications for a funded PhD position in Social and Cultural Anthropology at the University of Helsinki:

An Academy of Finland-funded project is searching for a PhD student, who has an MA in anthropology and relevant research experience, preferably in South Africa. The funding period is three years and four months, and the successful candidate is to begin work on the project in early 2017, or by June 2017 at the latest. S/he is to affiliate her-/himself with the Doctoral Programme in Social Sciences at the University of Helsinki.

Project, position and duties

The position exists within a project titled “The Morality of Success among the Emerging Black Middle Class in South Africa”. This project investigates the aims, practices and moral values of different segments of the emerging Black middle class in South Africa. It contributes to two main bodies of scholarly literature: the social scientific research on the values of the Black middle class and the anthropological research on morality. The project employs one (already identified) post-doctoral researcher in addition to the PhD student to be selected through this call.

The successful candidate will be required to undertake the collection of research material in South Africa and the writing of a PhD dissertation based upon this material. We are seeking a candidate with a proven track record in anthropology, and relevant research experience, ideally in South Africa. The successful candidate will conduct research on the practices and values of persons who belong to the new or the emerging Black middle class. The time reserved for field work in South Africa is 10-12 months.

In addition to completing his/her doctoral studies, the successful candidate will be expected to participate in the teaching of anthropology. The successful candidate will affiliate herself/himself with the unit of Anthropology and the Doctoral Program of Social Sciences and, with the exception of fieldwork and holiday periods, will be required to reside in the Helsinki area for the duration of the project. The working language of the project will be English.

The salary will be EUR 2300 per month. The appointment starts with a probationary period of four months.

Eligibility and applying

A doctoral student applicant must hold a Master’s degree with a strong passing grade and have a preliminary research plan submitted with the application. Other requirements include demonstrated ability and motivation to pursue doctoral studies according to the approved study plan.

Applications must be accompanied by the following documents:

–       Preliminary research plan including most relevant references (maximum length 5 pages);
–       Curriculum Vitae including a possible list of publications (maximum length 2 pages);
–       MA certificate and a transcript of grades
–       Description of the current stage of the dissertation work and motivational statement (maximum length 1 page);
–       Two academic references from persons who know the applicant’s work.

All qualifications and references will be carefully validated.

Further details on the University of Helsinki’s Doctoral Programme in Social Sciences are available online here: http://www.helsinki.fi/socialsciences/research/postgraduate/doctoral_programmes/dp_social_sciences.html

For practical details on studying at the University of Helsinki see here: https://www.helsinki.fi/en/studying

Please submit your application by 31 January, 2017.

Send your application by email, with all the above-listed attachments, to the two following persons: the Principal Investigator of the project, Tuulikki Pietilä (tuulikki.pietila@helsinki.fi<mailto:tuulikki.pietila@helsinki.fi>) and project’s post-doctoral researcher, Ibrahim Abraham (Ibrahim.abraham@helsinki.fi<mailto:Ibrahim.abraham@helsinki.fi>).

Further information about the position may be obtained from Tuulikki Pietilä.