‘Coffee and Cocktails’ Podcast series: looking for Early Career Researchers, 24 June 2017

What-Is-A-Podcast

SATURDAY 24 JUNE 2017

Time: 14.30-15.30 (GMT)

ETE is on the search for three early career researchers to participate in a two-part 20 minute podcast series based in Oxford called ‘Coffee and Cocktails’. The first podcast will focus on issues faced by early career researchers/ recent doctoral graduates regarding the job market, accompanied by drinks and snacks. This podcast is designed to be a laid back approach to rather serious concerns faced in academia. If you’d like to participate and/or have any ideas for future topics, please contact ETE’s Founder.

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Oxford University’s ‘Winter Festivals and Traditions’ conference- available online!

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The Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology (ISCA) at Oxford University has published their ‘Winter Festivals and Traditions’ conference on ETE Education’s YouTube Channel. More information on the speakers and their abstracts can be found here. Otherwise the presenters’ videos can be accessed here.

Enjoy!

Tickets on sale for ‘Winter festivals and traditions’ conference, Oxford University- 25 March, 2017

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http://www.wegottickets.com/event/392174

Tickets are now available for the ‘Winter festivals and traditions’ conference at Oxford University for 25 March 2017. A copy of the program is available below:

‘Winter Festivals and Traditions’ Conference

Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Oxford University

9.15-9.45- Registration (Coffee, tea and biscuits will be provided)- Make sure to bring your tickets with you when registering

9.45-10.00 – Opening remarks: Dr Ann Wand, Oxford University

10.00-11.15 – Panel I: Festivals through history

Chair: Johana Musalkova, Oxford University

Presenters:

Dr Brigid Burke, Montclair State University (USA)

The Lenaia: The winter festival of Dionysus in the context of Greek beliefs about death and the afterlife

Dr Joy Fraser, George Mason University (USA)

“Some fiends disguised as mummers”: The Isaac Mercer murder case and the politics of sectarianism in nineteenth century Newfoundland

Dr Richard Irvine, Cambridge University (UK)

Following the bear: the revival of East Anglian Straw Bear traditions

11.15-11.30- Break

11.30-12.30 – Guest speaker

Convenor: Dr Ann Wand, Oxford University

Dr Cesare Poppi, La Scuola Universitaria Professionale della Svizzera Italiana (Switzerland)

Sex and the Afterweb: rethinking tradition and cultural continuity

12.30-13.30 – Lunch (Coffee, tea and snacks will be provided)

13.30-14.45 – Panel II: Krampus and Christmas

Chair: Dr Ann Wand, Oxford University

Presenters:

Dr Gertraud Seiser and Dr Matthäus Rest, University of Vienna and University of Munich (Austria and Germany)

Wild and beautiful: the Krampus in Salzburg

Amber Dorko Stopper, co-founder of Parade of Spirits, Liberty Lands (USA)

Spectres and spectra: building self-sustaining folklore and neurodiversity inclusion into processional arts

Lucinda Murphy, Durham University (UK)

The nostalgia of Christmas worship: a resource for re-collection, re-flection and re-newal

14.45-15.15 = Coffee and tea break (biscuits included)

15.15-16.30- Panel III: Carnival, museums and department stores

Chair: Dr Nicolette Makovicky, Oxford University

Prof. Adrian Franklin, University of Tasmania (Australia)

Where ‘art meets life’: the making of Australia’s most successful mid-winter festival [Dark MOFO] in Hobart, Tasmania

Dr Gareth Hamilton and Dita Vinovska, University of Latvia

Losing ‘track’ of inverted time and space: the ‘Crazy Days’ in and outside a Finnish-owned department store in Riga

Dr Giovanni Kezich and Antonella Mott, Museo degli Usi e Costumi della Gente Trentina (Italy)

Carnival king of Europe: European winter masquerades in ethnographic perspective

16.30-16.45 – Break

16.45-17.45- Panel IV: Animals in festivals

Chair: Robin Smith, Oxford University

Dr Francesco Della Costa, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Be’er Sheva (Israel)

The venerable pig: ritual food sharing within a traditional festival in Abruzzo, Italy

Pawel Sendyka, Jagiellonian University (Poland)

The bacas and the priests: how the old adversaries came together to revive and reinterpret tradition

17.45-18.00- Closing remarks: Dr Robert Parkin, Oxford University

 

Call for papers: Winter festivals and traditions, Oxford University- 25 March 2017

Call for papers: Conference on Winter Festivals and Traditions at Oxford University, 25 March 2017

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The Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology (ISCA) at Oxford University will be hosting a one-day conference on Saturday 25 March 2017. The conference will focus on ‘Winter Festivals and Traditions’ as part of a larger research discussion on ritual, religion and secularism in modern-day Europe. We invite participants with disciplines in anthropology, religious studies, cultural studies, folklore and similar professions. Topics for submission are not restricted to Europe, but can focus on traditions worldwide.

The objective of this conference is to bring together various disciplines and departments to reconsider how folklore can be interpreted in order to understand the reasoning behind modern traditions in society. Our guest speaker, Dr Cesare Poppi, PhD (Cantab) of la Scuola Universitaria Professionale della Svizzera Italiana (SUPSI), will contribute to an invigorating discussion based on his extensive research on masked rituals and traditions in South Tyrol and Trentino, Italy and Northwestern Ghana.

Paper themes for consideration include, but are not limited to:

  • Mumming/ Masks
  • Neo-paganism, Wicca/ Witchcraft
  • Performance studies
  • Ritual and symbolism
  • Folklore and myth
  • Festivals, nationalism and the State
  • Identity politics
  • Museum studies
  • Religion and Secularism

Applicants should submit abstracts of no more than 250 words followed by a brief description of their background by 7 February 2017. Successful applicants will be notified by 15 February 2017.

Please send your abstracts and any questions you may have to the convenor, Dr Ann Wand at: ann.wand(at)anthro.ox.ac.uk

Call for applications for a funded PhD position studying black middle class in South Africa

Call for applications for a funded PhD position in Social and Cultural Anthropology at the University of Helsinki:

An Academy of Finland-funded project is searching for a PhD student, who has an MA in anthropology and relevant research experience, preferably in South Africa. The funding period is three years and four months, and the successful candidate is to begin work on the project in early 2017, or by June 2017 at the latest. S/he is to affiliate her-/himself with the Doctoral Programme in Social Sciences at the University of Helsinki.

Project, position and duties

The position exists within a project titled “The Morality of Success among the Emerging Black Middle Class in South Africa”. This project investigates the aims, practices and moral values of different segments of the emerging Black middle class in South Africa. It contributes to two main bodies of scholarly literature: the social scientific research on the values of the Black middle class and the anthropological research on morality. The project employs one (already identified) post-doctoral researcher in addition to the PhD student to be selected through this call.

The successful candidate will be required to undertake the collection of research material in South Africa and the writing of a PhD dissertation based upon this material. We are seeking a candidate with a proven track record in anthropology, and relevant research experience, ideally in South Africa. The successful candidate will conduct research on the practices and values of persons who belong to the new or the emerging Black middle class. The time reserved for field work in South Africa is 10-12 months.

In addition to completing his/her doctoral studies, the successful candidate will be expected to participate in the teaching of anthropology. The successful candidate will affiliate herself/himself with the unit of Anthropology and the Doctoral Program of Social Sciences and, with the exception of fieldwork and holiday periods, will be required to reside in the Helsinki area for the duration of the project. The working language of the project will be English.

The salary will be EUR 2300 per month. The appointment starts with a probationary period of four months.

Eligibility and applying

A doctoral student applicant must hold a Master’s degree with a strong passing grade and have a preliminary research plan submitted with the application. Other requirements include demonstrated ability and motivation to pursue doctoral studies according to the approved study plan.

Applications must be accompanied by the following documents:

–       Preliminary research plan including most relevant references (maximum length 5 pages);
–       Curriculum Vitae including a possible list of publications (maximum length 2 pages);
–       MA certificate and a transcript of grades
–       Description of the current stage of the dissertation work and motivational statement (maximum length 1 page);
–       Two academic references from persons who know the applicant’s work.

All qualifications and references will be carefully validated.

Further details on the University of Helsinki’s Doctoral Programme in Social Sciences are available online here: http://www.helsinki.fi/socialsciences/research/postgraduate/doctoral_programmes/dp_social_sciences.html

For practical details on studying at the University of Helsinki see here: https://www.helsinki.fi/en/studying

Please submit your application by 31 January, 2017.

Send your application by email, with all the above-listed attachments, to the two following persons: the Principal Investigator of the project, Tuulikki Pietilä (tuulikki.pietila@helsinki.fi<mailto:tuulikki.pietila@helsinki.fi>) and project’s post-doctoral researcher, Ibrahim Abraham (Ibrahim.abraham@helsinki.fi<mailto:Ibrahim.abraham@helsinki.fi>).

Further information about the position may be obtained from Tuulikki Pietilä.

Launch and First Workshop of The Irish Network for the Study of Esotericism and Paganism

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Launch and First Workshop of The Irish Network for the Study of Esotericism and Paganism

In association with the Department of Study of Religions

University College Cork

Friday 31st March 2017

We are pleased to invite scholars to take part in the launch and first workshop of the Irish Network for the Study of Esotericism and Paganism (INSEP), a multidisciplinary research network for scholars working on any aspect of Esotericism (historical or contemporary) or Contemporary Paganism that relates to the Irish context. Its mission is to provide a forum for networking and collaboration among scholars who are based in Ireland and those based abroad who have research interests in the subject areas of esotericism and contemporary Paganism as they relate to Ireland. A general goal of the network is to establish a forum for academics – whether established researchers, postgraduate students, early career researchers or independent scholars – to communicate with each other, share information on relevant conferences and other events, and to promote interdisciplinary collaboration among those researching in the areas of Irish esotericism and Pagan Studies. The Irish Network for the Study of Esotericism and Paganism is a Regional Network of the European Society for the Study of Western Esotericism: http://www.esswe.org/Regional
The INSEP invites papers and contributions on the subject of esotericism and Contemporary Paganism that relate to the Irish context, including areas such as:

  • Esotericism, political change and social movements
  • Ethnography and Western Esotericism
  • Contemporary Pagan Studies in Ireland and/or international connections
  • Media representations
  • The notion of Celtic Spirituality
  • Theoretical frameworks/changing paradigms in the academic study of religions

Call for papers: Please submit your proposal in the form of a title and an abstract (max. 250 words), stating institutional affiliation (or independent scholar) to Dr Jenny Butler: j.butler[at]ucc.ie by 21 December 2016. Please put ‘INSEP Proposal’ in the subject line.

 

Crossing Borders, Breaking Walls: Movement in the French and Italian Speaking Worlds

An interdisciplinary graduate student conference
Hosted by the Department of French and Italian
Indiana University Bloomington
March 10–11, 2017
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Crossing Borders, Breaking Walls:
Movement in the French and Italian Speaking Worlds
For as long as our ancestors have populated the earth, human beings have been in constant movement. In movement, the fortunes of peoples rise and fall, old cultures are transformed and new cultures are born. In movement, our ideas collide, our thoughts intertwine and our languages become our sword and shield, but also the harbinger and sculptor of our identities. But there is also another movement, the crossing of not only physical but also metaphysical boundaries: writers who aspire to music in their verses, filmmakers who capture social changes within their frames, women and other minority writers who break the shackles of traditional images—all souls that are not deterred by the conventional limits of their arts. Borders could be affirmative, stressful and violent, but also fluid, productive and revolutionary. There are walls—even today—that are unbreakable and borders uncrossed, be they geographical, social or creative. It is in the upholding of borders that we confront with the limits of our existence; it is in the breaking of walls that we evolve as a species and reinvent our identities as human beings.
Possible areas of reflection:
o   Activism in literature/art/music/cinema and documentary
o   African studies
o   Bilingualism
o   Colonialism/Post-colonialism/Neo-colonialism
o   Crossovers between genres and medias
o   Exoticism/Orientalism
o   Expatriate writer/artists/musicians/filmmakers
o   Folklore/Folk art/Folk music or ethnomusicology
o   Transgendered identity
o   Immigration/refugee issues today and in history
o   Language varieties and contact
o   Migration and estrangement
o   National identity
o   Religious/ethnical contact and conflicts
o   Translation
o   Transnational cinema and literature
o   Travel literature
o   Women and other minority writers/artists/musicians/filmmakers
We welcome submissions from graduate students. Presentations may be in English, French or Italian and should not exceed 20 minutes. Please send abstracts (200/300 words) to iufritgsoconf@gmail.com by January 20, 2017. Let us know if you have any requests for technology or special arrangements, and we will do our best to accommodate them. In addition to your abstract, please include your presentation title, name, contact information, institutional/departmental affiliation and research interests.