Tickets on sale for ‘Winter festivals and traditions’ conference, Oxford University- 25 March, 2017

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http://www.wegottickets.com/event/392174

Tickets are now available for the ‘Winter festivals and traditions’ conference at Oxford University for 25 March 2017. A copy of the program is available below:

‘Winter Festivals and Traditions’ Conference

Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Oxford University

9.15-9.45- Registration (Coffee, tea and biscuits will be provided)- Make sure to bring your tickets with you when registering

9.45-10.00 – Opening remarks: Dr Ann Wand, Oxford University

10.00-11.15 – Panel I: Festivals through history

Chair: Johana Musalkova, Oxford University

Presenters:

Dr Brigid Burke, Montclair State University (USA)

The Lenaia: The winter festival of Dionysus in the context of Greek beliefs about death and the afterlife

Dr Joy Fraser, George Mason University (USA)

“Some fiends disguised as mummers”: The Isaac Mercer murder case and the politics of sectarianism in nineteenth century Newfoundland

Dr Richard Irvine, Cambridge University (UK)

Following the bear: the revival of East Anglian Straw Bear traditions

11.15-11.30- Break

11.30-12.30 – Guest speaker

Convenor: Dr Ann Wand, Oxford University

Dr Cesare Poppi, La Scuola Universitaria Professionale della Svizzera Italiana (Switzerland)

Sex and the Afterweb: rethinking tradition and cultural continuity

12.30-13.30 – Lunch (Coffee, tea and snacks will be provided)

13.30-14.45 – Panel II: Krampus and Christmas

Chair: Dr Ann Wand, Oxford University

Presenters:

Dr Gertraud Seiser and Dr Matthäus Rest, University of Vienna and University of Munich (Austria and Germany)

Wild and beautiful: the Krampus in Salzburg

Amber Dorko Stopper, co-founder of Parade of Spirits, Liberty Lands (USA)

Spectres and spectra: building self-sustaining folklore and neurodiversity inclusion into processional arts

Lucinda Murphy, Durham University (UK)

The nostalgia of Christmas worship: a resource for re-collection, re-flection and re-newal

14.45-15.15 = Coffee and tea break (biscuits included)

15.15-16.30- Panel III: Carnival, museums and department stores

Chair: Dr Nicolette Makovicky, Oxford University

Prof. Adrian Franklin, University of Tasmania (Australia)

Where ‘art meets life’: the making of Australia’s most successful mid-winter festival [Dark MOFO] in Hobart, Tasmania

Dr Gareth Hamilton and Dita Vinovska, University of Latvia

Losing ‘track’ of inverted time and space: the ‘Crazy Days’ in and outside a Finnish-owned department store in Riga

Dr Giovanni Kezich and Antonella Mott, Museo degli Usi e Costumi della Gente Trentina (Italy)

Carnival king of Europe: European winter masquerades in ethnographic perspective

16.30-16.45 – Break

16.45-17.45- Panel IV: Animals in festivals

Chair: Robin Smith, Oxford University

Dr Francesco Della Costa, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Be’er Sheva (Israel)

The venerable pig: ritual food sharing within a traditional festival in Abruzzo, Italy

Pawel Sendyka, Jagiellonian University (Poland)

The bacas and the priests: how the old adversaries came together to revive and reinterpret tradition

17.45-18.00- Closing remarks: Dr Robert Parkin, Oxford University

 

Call for papers: Winter festivals and traditions, Oxford University- 25 March 2017

Call for papers: Conference on Winter Festivals and Traditions at Oxford University, 25 March 2017

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The Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology (ISCA) at Oxford University will be hosting a one-day conference on Saturday 25 March 2017. The conference will focus on ‘Winter Festivals and Traditions’ as part of a larger research discussion on ritual, religion and secularism in modern-day Europe. We invite participants with disciplines in anthropology, religious studies, cultural studies, folklore and similar professions. Topics for submission are not restricted to Europe, but can focus on traditions worldwide.

The objective of this conference is to bring together various disciplines and departments to reconsider how folklore can be interpreted in order to understand the reasoning behind modern traditions in society. Our guest speaker, Dr Cesare Poppi, PhD (Cantab) of la Scuola Universitaria Professionale della Svizzera Italiana (SUPSI), will contribute to an invigorating discussion based on his extensive research on masked rituals and traditions in South Tyrol and Trentino, Italy and Northwestern Ghana.

Paper themes for consideration include, but are not limited to:

  • Mumming/ Masks
  • Neo-paganism, Wicca/ Witchcraft
  • Performance studies
  • Ritual and symbolism
  • Folklore and myth
  • Festivals, nationalism and the State
  • Identity politics
  • Museum studies
  • Religion and Secularism

Applicants should submit abstracts of no more than 250 words followed by a brief description of their background by 7 February 2017. Successful applicants will be notified by 15 February 2017.

Please send your abstracts and any questions you may have to the convenor, Dr Ann Wand at: ann.wand(at)anthro.ox.ac.uk

Launch and First Workshop of The Irish Network for the Study of Esotericism and Paganism

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Launch and First Workshop of The Irish Network for the Study of Esotericism and Paganism

In association with the Department of Study of Religions

University College Cork

Friday 31st March 2017

We are pleased to invite scholars to take part in the launch and first workshop of the Irish Network for the Study of Esotericism and Paganism (INSEP), a multidisciplinary research network for scholars working on any aspect of Esotericism (historical or contemporary) or Contemporary Paganism that relates to the Irish context. Its mission is to provide a forum for networking and collaboration among scholars who are based in Ireland and those based abroad who have research interests in the subject areas of esotericism and contemporary Paganism as they relate to Ireland. A general goal of the network is to establish a forum for academics – whether established researchers, postgraduate students, early career researchers or independent scholars – to communicate with each other, share information on relevant conferences and other events, and to promote interdisciplinary collaboration among those researching in the areas of Irish esotericism and Pagan Studies. The Irish Network for the Study of Esotericism and Paganism is a Regional Network of the European Society for the Study of Western Esotericism: http://www.esswe.org/Regional
The INSEP invites papers and contributions on the subject of esotericism and Contemporary Paganism that relate to the Irish context, including areas such as:

  • Esotericism, political change and social movements
  • Ethnography and Western Esotericism
  • Contemporary Pagan Studies in Ireland and/or international connections
  • Media representations
  • The notion of Celtic Spirituality
  • Theoretical frameworks/changing paradigms in the academic study of religions

Call for papers: Please submit your proposal in the form of a title and an abstract (max. 250 words), stating institutional affiliation (or independent scholar) to Dr Jenny Butler: j.butler[at]ucc.ie by 21 December 2016. Please put ‘INSEP Proposal’ in the subject line.

 

The Social Aspects of Death, Dying and Disposal 13: Ritual, Religion and Magic

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The Social Aspects of Death, Dying and Disposal 13

Ritual, Religion and Magic

06-10 September 2017

University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK

In popular western culture the number 13 is often unlucky, evoking superstition, or witches. Yet there were 13 members of the last supper, Friday the 13th is lucky in Italy and in Judaism it is the age for rites of passage. The theme for this DDD is Ritual, Religion and Magic; its perception, interpretation and role in healthcare, death, dying, and burial.

Individual papers might include, but are not restricted to: death technology and magic, liminality, religion and spirituality in end of life care, ethics and culture at the deathbed, dying inside (and outside) of modern health care, spirituality and the death of animals, rites of passage in dying, superstition and funerals, ritual application in preparing the corpse and burring the dead. Emergent religious and cultural practices in the disposal of the dead, ancestors online, death, dying and grief in public and on the internet. Talking with the dead, the dead in popular horror, the dead in witchcraft execution or haunting or social rituals associated with the dead body, spirituality or lifeways and deathways.

Please submit your abstract via the online form by 28 February 2017. Abstracts should be no more than 250 words.

Abstract submission:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfhGbf4qgPskRFHkSPJ3oW04SLW4i3KfpUZ7MWS9jPyCH69aQ/viewform?c=0&w=1

Contact dsayer@uclan.ac.uk or Elizabeth J Roberts EJRoberts@uclan.ac.uk for enquiries.

Tweet #DDD13 to start a trend, @DuncanSayer.

ETE is looking for writers/ contributors!

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ETE is currently in the process of expanding its reading audience outside of academia. We’re looking for academics and non-academics alike with a general passion for writing to contribute articles to our site. Preferable topics include:

Travel

History and Archaeology

Politics

Global Affairs and Current Events

Anthropology

Education

Religion

Science

Arts and Pop Culture

This site is an opportunity for early researchers, bloggers and burgeoning writers to advertise their skills to an open forum. If interested, please send an email to the following address:  ann.wand@anthro.ox.ac.uk

We look forward to hearing from you!


Posted by ETE’s Founder/ Editor: Dr Ann Wand

The pollution of the Ganges and the dying of the Mother Goddess

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This morning I came across a rather disturbing article on the effects that pollution has on the Ganges river. While some of the facts mentioned in this article may come as no surprise, it is fascinating to note that some members of the Hindu community feel that the river is self-cleansing as it is considered a goddess. This article could be an interesting tool for the discussion of religion alongside ethics and how modern-day concepts of pollution are dealt with in religiously sensitive areas.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/resources/idt-aad46fca-734a-45f9-8721-61404cc12a39


Posted by ETE’s Founder/ Editor: Dr Ann Wand